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Putting Children on a Weight Loss Plan

MariposaMariposa
posted 1 year 10 months ago
I'm not sure how I feel about this one. I know that childhood obesity is a huge issue now... but some of the ways people are choosing to slim kids down seem to me to be quite dangerous medically.

Not only that, damaging to self esteem also. Constantly being chided about weight at home is... well, devastating. The counter point of that is that if weight is *not* gotten under control, there's going to be bullying at school or even from siblings.

So how to fix this? I think that making dietary changes for the *family* to "get healthier" without pointing out a child's weight is probably the way I'd go. I have a friend who was appalled to hear two of their children tormenting a third by calling her "pork chop" while THEY were eating birthday cake in front of her. Those things crush a spirit and last a lifetime.

I'm not facing this with my daughter but I have a niece and step nephew who are going down this road rapidly. I doubt that I'll be asked for advice but just in case I am, does anyone else have ideas of action plans without destroying a child's joie de vivre?


JosiePJosieP
posted 1 year 10 months ago
The only way to deal with weight issues, is to eat properly.. no way around it. Restricting calories, avoiding certain foods, EATING certain foods thinking they're a magic bullet, excessively exercising etc.. all ways to torture yourself and make you very unhealthy. Eating foods that are meant to be eaten, until you're statisfied, is the only way to go. The weight will naturally fall off and health will skyrocket.

Lifestyle change.. not a diet. People making the switch need to take it as it comes, one step at a time, but make the goal *as little processed foods as possible*. If right now that means switching out one or two things at a time, that's perfect.. whatever doesn't feel like torture. Expect to hate it once in a while, but in the end, we have to look at food differently and see it as a positive change.. otherwise we fail. And let the taste buds change! LOL.. that means a couple weeks, maybe a little more. So if you're having "cheat days" (sabotage days), or as long as there are still highly fatty/salty/sugary foods in the diet.. expect that two or so weeks to never begin.

Also, they need to keep in mind that losing weight does not mean LESS food. Not less of the real thing, anyway... definitely less of the junk or other highly processed foods though. When eating real foods, you need MORE because they aren't as calorie dense. So the good part of eating healthfully to someone who is overweight, is that they can eat as much as they want. Pretty much anyway. Don't go overboard, just stop when satiated, but NEVER before. This will gradually lessen as the body adjusts and loses it's bulk and need for more calories to function. Because that's the biggest point right there.. you NEED calories. Just to breathe and think and walk and talk and blink.. so to restrict is to hurt your body. Our bodies want us healthy by default.. they don't sabotage us, we sabotage them, so if we listen to them more, we'll be much better off for it.

And of course exercise. In my opinion, and my many years around the fitness industry in one way or another, getting it any way you can is sufficient. Do it in fun, sustainable ways, you don't need a gym and in fact, I'm almost to the point I'm against them altogether now LOL. Exercise is most important for overall health.. it's absolutely mandatory.. but it's not the answer to weight loss. In fact, for the obese or those who aren't used to exercise, jumping in full speed ahead can actually be detrimental and I don't suggest it. Whatever is comfortable, whatever is sustainable and go from there.

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