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Nursety rhymes and their origins

glowingsunglowingsun
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
Place your post her If you know the origin of a nursery rhyme or lullaby!

Humpty Dumpty originated as a comical rhyme of the falling of king henery 8th!

Rock-a-bye baby was a mothers rhyme of how she placed her baby in a tree and the branch broke.


hapydazyhapydazy Moderator
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
I'm pretty sure that Ring Around the Rosie had to do with the Black Plague?? Kind of morbid...

TAMSTAMS
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
Humpty Dumpty is actually a cannon.

Incy Wincey spider is a play on a poem by Robbie Burns.

LucyLucy
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
ring a ring of rosies is because of the plague!

glowingsunglowingsun
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
So we've got Humpty Dumpty, Ring-around-the-rosie and Rock-a-bye baby.

RichRich Moderator
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago

Lucy said:
ring a ring of rosies is because of the plague!


Common misconception, however, it is NOT a song about the plague.

hapydazyhapydazy Moderator
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago

Rich said:

Lucy said:
ring a ring of rosies is because of the plague!


Common misconception, however, it is NOT a song about the plague.


I stand corrected, but you know I had to research it first!! Razz

check this out...

hapydazyhapydazy Moderator
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
nursery rhyme origins

kristagkristag
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
Interestingly, it seems there is a difference of opinion about Ring around the Rosy from the US to the UK. Here in the UK, it is considered linked to the Black Death. I must admit, that was what I was told at school and always believed. You might be interested in this:

Ring Around the Rosy

Looks like it has more than one connotation Smile

RichRich Moderator
posted 1 decade 3 weeks ago
From Wiki

Many have associated the poem with the Great Plague of London in 1665, or with earlier outbreaks of bubonic plague in England. Interpreters of the rhyme before the second world war make no mention of this;[16] by 1951, however, it seems to have become well established as an explanation for the form of the rhyme that had become standard in Britain. Peter and Iona Opie remark[17]: ‘The invariable sneezing and falling down in modern English versions have given would-be origin finders the opportunity to say that the rhyme dates back to the Great Plague. A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, posies of herbs were carried as protection, sneezing was a final fatal symptom , and “all fall down” was exactly what happened.’[18] Variations of the same theory allow it to be applied to the American version of the rhyme and to medieval plagues.[19] In its various forms, the interpretation has entered into popular culture and has been used elsewhere to make oblique reference to the plague.[20] (For 'hidden meaning' in other nursery rhymes see Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary and Cock Robin.)

If true, the modern English version of the song might be reinterpreted in modern vernacular as follows:

"Symptoms of serious illness
Flowers to ward off the stench
We're burning the corpses
We all drop dead."

But folklore scholars regard the theory as baseless for several reasons:

1. the late appearance of the explanation means that it has no tradition, only the value of its content;[16]
2. the facts described do not fit especially well at least with the Great Plague;[18][21] Refutable: see Symptoms of bubonic plague
3. the great variety of forms makes it unlikely that the modern form is the most ancient one, and the words on which the interpretation are based are not found in many of the earliest records of the rhyme (see above);[19][22]
4. European and 19th century versions of the rhyme suggest that this 'fall' was not a literal falling down, but a curtsy or other form of bending movement that was common in other dramatic singing games.[23]
5. Neither a rosy rash nor sneezing were symptoms of the plague (or any plague variation)[citation needed] Refutable: see Symptoms of bubonic plague. And the earliest recorded words from 1881 were "Ashes, Ashes" in reference to burning things, not "achoo, achoo".

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